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Beautiful Boy is visually stunning and well acted with an original story line. But....

Wednesday 30th January 2019 | Grace

Based on the true story of a father and son’s experience of dealing with one mans destructive crystal meth addiction, Beautiful Boy is emotional, harrowing and well, beautiful. David Sheff, a successful journalist, discovers that his son, Nick, as a way of coping with depression, starts experimenting with anything he can get his hands on, finally only being able to find escapism through one of the most destructive and addictive drugs out there; meth. In David’s despair, he does anything he can to help his son, but along the way, becomes a victim of his own good doings as his own life becomes torn apart through his obsession with helping his eldest child get better.

However… Despite the amazing visuals of long shots as Nick drives spontaneously through the vast Californian countryside, his hair blowing gently in the warm American breeze, for a film about hardship, it seems to be from the point of view from somebody who has never experienced any real hardship. Of course, drug addiction, or addiction of any kind, is horrible! It ruins lives and it’s so great that there is a film that highlights the issues and help that is needed with this. And yes, the cinematography is stunning! But, the portrayal of being addicted to one of the worst drugs around is all a bit too Hollywood in this film. Nick and David live in a HUGE house in San Francisco, David is SO supportive of his son and the scenes of drug taking look like they’ve been made suite an audience who only watches CBBC’s Newsround.

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There are over 25,000 meth users in the UK (according to The Independent). It’s great that Hollywood wanted to show the world this issue, but does it have to be done through they eyes of a rich kid who has everything? So many people have a story to tell and need help, let’s stop the stigma and make a film with those people instead!

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